1. Researcher uses music to manage networks
  2. The evolution of doors and windows
  3. Day trips from Newcastle
  4. Warwickshire the heart of English history
  5. Periodic table still influencing today’s research
  6. Engineers translate brain signals directly into speech
  7. Manchester’s cultural must-sees the top sights in a changing city
  8. Scratching beneath the surface of veneers
  9. Smart home tests first elder care robot
  10. Charting a path to cheaper flexible solar cells
  11. The Photographer and Architecture
  12. Multicolor holography technology could enable extremely compact 3D displays
  13. Highlights of hidden England – Lincoln and beyond
  14. Using drones to tackle climate change
  15. At the Flip of a Switch
  16. Variations in seafloor create freak ocean waves
  17. Scientists develop first fabric to automatically cool or insulate depending on conditions
  18. Going underground exploring the best sights below London
  19. Concrete Utopia
  20. New fuel cell concept brings biological design to better electricity generation
  21. Quantum transfer at the push of a button
  22. Physicists create exotic electron liquid
  23. Two days in Oxford
  24. Royal Academy expansion reveals hidden life of art schools
  25. Millions of tons of plastic waste could be turned into clean fuels, other products
  26. Speed of light toward a future quantum internet
  27. A perfect day in London
  28. Like something from Pompeii’ – Battersea Arts Centre’s scorching resurrection
  29. Converting Wi-Fi signals to electricity with new 2D materials
  30. After making history, NASA’s tiny deep-space satellites go silent
  31. Night sky Britain aurora-spotting and stargazing in England, Scotland and Wales
  32. London through the ages architectural insights into the capital’s history
  33. Fasting ramps up human metabolism, study shows
  34. Scientists find increase in asteroid impacts on ancient Earth by studying the Moon
  35. Artificial intelligence can identify microscopic marine organisms
  36. Living by the tides on Northumberland’s Holy Island
  37. HP is making a new VR headset with a super high resolution
  38. HOW A NEW SATELLITE CONSTELLATION COULD ALLOW US TO TRACK PLANES ALL OVER THE GLOBE
  39. An architectural tour of Liverpool’s fascinating history
  40. Patisandhika and Daniel Mitchell complete A Brutalist Tropical Home in Bali
  41. These genetic ‘goggles’ could help us engineer wildly resilient crops
  42. Best things to do in Yorkshire in spring
Artificial intelligence can identify microscopic marine organisms

Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) program that can automatically provide species-level identification of microscopic marine organisms. The next step is to incorporate the AI into a robotic system that will help advance our understanding of the world’s oceans, both now and in our prehistoric past.

Specifically, the AI program has proven capable of identifying six species of foraminifera, or forams — organisms that have been prevalent in Earth’s oceans for more than 100 million years.

Forams are protists, neither plant nor animal. When they die, they leave behind their tiny shells, most less than a millimeter wide. These shells give scientists insights into the characteristics of the oceans as they existed when the forams were alive. For example, different types of foram species thrive in different kinds of ocean environments, and chemical measurements can tell scientists about everything from the ocean’s chemistry to its temperature when the shell was being formed.

However, evaluating those foram shells and fossils is both tedious and time consuming. That’s why an interdisciplinary team of researchers, with expertise ranging from robotics to paleoceanography, is working to automate the process.

“At this point, the AI correctly identifies the forams about 80 percent of the time, which is better than most trained humans,” says Edgar Lobaton, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at North Carolina State University and co-author of a paper on the work.

“But this is only the proof of concept. We expect the system to improve over time, because machine learning means the program will get more accurate and more consistent with every iteration. We also plan to expand the AI’s purview, so that it can identify at least 35 species of forams, rather than the current six.”

The current system works by placing a foram under a microscope capable of taking photographs. An LED ring shines light onto the foram from 16 directions — one at a time — while taking an image of the foram with each change in light. These 16 images are combined to provide as much geometric information as possible about the foram’s shape. The AI then uses this information to identify the foram’s species.

The scanning and identification takes only seconds, and is already as fast — or faster — than the fastest human experts.

“Plus, the AI doesn’t get tired or bored,” Lobaton says. “This work demonstrates the successful first step toward building a robotic platform that will be able to identify, pick and sort forams automatically.”

Lobaton and his collaborators have received a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF), starting in January 2019, to build the fully-functional robotic system.

“This work is important because oceans cover about 70 percent of Earth’s surface and play an enormous role in its climate,” says Tom Marchitto, an associate professor of geological sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and corresponding author of the paper.

“Forams are ubiquitous in our oceans, and the chemistry of their shells records the physical and chemical characteristics of the waters that they grew in. These tiny organisms bear witness to past properties like temperature, salinity, acidity and nutrient concentrations. In turn we can use those properties to reconstruct ocean circulation and heat transport during past climate events.

“This matters because humanity is in the midst of an unintentional, global-scale climate ‘experiment’ due to our emission of greenhouse gases,” Marchitto says. “To predict the outcomes of that experiment we need a better understanding of how Earth’s climate behaves when its energy balance is altered. The new AI, and the robotic system it will enable, could significantly expedite our ability to learn more about the relationship between the climate and the oceans across vast time scales.”

Cart

Werk Press

VPS-HOST digital universe is the first stop for savvy readers. Our website is the companion tool for smart internet readers. For cities around the globe, travellers can find things to do, places to eat, where to shop, entertainment options and event happenings. Timely stories and blog content, plus a resource of 50,000+ things to do for people, coupled with our funny blogs, makes us a a useful resource to today’s audience.